The Mysterious Non-Firing Glock 17R

The impossible-to-own-legally Glock 18 and the we-can’t-have-nice-things-because-of-our-stupid-import-laws Glock 25 are the two guns most Glock collectors will never have in their collections. Next on the list is perhaps Glock’s 17R, with the “R” referring to the automatic trigger Reset. This allows the shooter to practice dry firing on a gun that can’t actually shoot a live round. Sounds great, but I’ve learned that the 17R isn’t quite the training pistol nirvana that it’s cracked up to be.

A Hungarian FÉG PA-63

Fegyver- és Gépgyártó Részvénytársaság is a mouthful, but the PA-63 pistol that came out of this Hungarian factory is a surprisingly manageable and well-made compact pistol that belies its Soviet-era roots.

Ruger Single … Seven?

Ruger’s Single Six is a venerable gun dating back to Bill Ruger’s early days, when the wild west cowboy mystique was alive and well and the market for single action guns was strong. Demand has ebbed and flowed over the years, but Ruger continues to produce them (albeit in a “new” variety with a transfer bar safety bar that makes it safe to carry “locked and cocked”). The Single Nine and Single Ten are chambered in .22 Magnum and .22 Long Rifle respectively. This makes the Single Seven something of an oddity in its .327 Federal Magnum chambering.

The Underappreciated Smith & Wesson 22A

The Smith & Wesson Model 41 has earned its place among the world’s finest .22 target pistols for good reason. And the SW22 Victory has been getting good press alongside Ruger’s Mark IV, which now joins the world of guns that can be taken down (and reassembled) by mere mortals. But what of Smith & Wesson’s forgotten 22A, which was made in their Houlton, Maine factory alongside handcuffs and other handgun parts?

The short answer: the 22A is a mixed bag, but given that new (or nearly new) examples can be found in the $200 range right now, they may be one of the best target .22LR bargains going.

The Lowly Smith & Wesson .35 Automatic

The “Smith & Wesson Automatic,” as it was advertised, or the “Model of 1913” as the collectors refer to it, is a gun that by all measures should have done well. Its innovations still delight and amaze, and were it not for some bad timing, this gun could have been far more influential than the historical footnote that it has been relegated to.

The basics: the .35 S&W Auto chambering is almost identical to the .32 Automatic Colt Pistol round that would come to dominate the world of semiautomatic pocket pistols for decades. Manufacturers knew that getting the public hooked on a particular caliber of ammunition with the manufacturer’s name in it was a source of free advertising (like the ubiquitous .38 Smith & Wesson round). In the early years of Smith & Wesson when the Model 1 was the only gun sold by the little company, it was sufficient to simply purchase ammunition for the Smith & Wesson, and the earliest ammunition was known thus.