Posts in Category: Blog

An Old Beretta 92F Gets New Life

 Probably not the original box for it, but it’s cool as heck anyways.

Old Italian police-issue Beretta 92F’s have been appearing on the market of late. Dating back to the late 1970’s and lacking the typical Italian hallmarks (which weren’t required when the gun is sold for law enforcement or military purposes), these guns can now be found in the $250 range. It’s worth noting that the magazine release on these is at the heel of the grip (instead of near the trigger guard) and they do have the dreaded import marks on them, making them somewhat less interesting to fussy collectors. But at just a few Washingtons more than a High Point, they are worth exploring.

I picked up one such pistol from Robertson Trading Post and was delighted to receive a gun in much better condition than many of the usual duty guns found at gun shows. There was some holster wear and the lanyard loop on the bottom of the grip was dented a bit, but I’m not sure that this gun has actually seen all that many rounds down the pipe. All in all, having a classic, all-metal niner for about $250 isn’t a bad deal at all. But is it worth it?

A Mixed Bag: Taurus Millennium PT111 G2

Taurus’s PT-111 Millennium G2 wades into the densely populated niche of compact polymer pistols at a price point that is hard to ignore. An MSRP of $300 and a street price of around $225 puts it a bit higher than Hi-Point cheap, but significantly less than other worthy competitors from Smith & Wesson and Glock. You’ll realistically be parting with at least three Benjamins for the Shield and four (or more) for the Austrian wunderkid, and that extra Benjamin saved with the Taurus is good for a healthy range trip (or two). But does the Brazilian really compete with the establishment?

The Mysterious Non-Firing Glock 17R

The impossible-to-own-legally Glock 18 and the we-can’t-have-nice-things-because-of-our-stupid-import-laws Glock 25 are the two guns most Glock collectors will never have in their collections. Next on the list is perhaps Glock’s 17R, with the “R” referring to the automatic trigger Reset. This allows the shooter to practice dry firing on a gun that can’t actually shoot a live round. Sounds great, but I’ve learned that the 17R isn’t quite the training pistol nirvana that it’s cracked up to be.

A Hungarian FÉG PA-63

Fegyver- és Gépgyártó Részvénytársaság is a mouthful, but the PA-63 pistol that came out of this Hungarian factory is a surprisingly manageable and well-made compact pistol that belies its Soviet-era roots.

Ruger Single … Seven?

Ruger’s Single Six is a venerable gun dating back to Bill Ruger’s early days, when the wild west cowboy mystique was alive and well and the market for single action guns was strong. Demand has ebbed and flowed over the years, but Ruger continues to produce them (albeit in a “new” variety with a transfer bar safety bar that makes it safe to carry “locked and cocked”). The Single Nine and Single Ten are chambered in .22 Magnum and .22 Long Rifle respectively. This makes the Single Seven something of an oddity in its .327 Federal Magnum chambering.