A Mixed Bag: Taurus Millennium PT111 G2

Taurus’s PT-111 Millennium G2 wades into the densely populated niche of compact polymer pistols at a price point that is hard to ignore. An MSRP of $300 and a street price of around $225 puts it a bit higher than Hi-Point cheap, but significantly less than other worthy competitors from Smith & Wesson and Glock. You’ll realistically be parting with at least three Benjamins for the Shield and four (or more) for the Austrian wunderkid, and that extra Benjamin saved with the Taurus is good for a healthy range trip (or two). But does the Brazilian really compete with the establishment?

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Glock 17R: The Mysterious Non-Firing Glock

The impossible-to-own-legally Glock 18 and the we-can’t-have-nice-things-because-of-our-stupid-import-laws Glock 25 are the two guns most Glock collectors will never have in their collections. Of the weapons that mortals can own the Glock 17R may be at the top of the list. The “R” refers to the automatic trigger Reset. This allows the shooter to practice dry firing on a gun that looks and feels like a real Glock. But the gun’s design means that it can’t actually chamber and shoot a live round. Sounds great, right? I’ve learned that the 17R isn’t quite the training pistol nirvana that it’s cracked up to be.

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Ruger Single … Seven?

Ruger’s Single Six is a venerable gun dating back to Bill Ruger’s early days, when the wild west cowboy mystique was alive and well and the market for single action guns was strong. Demand has ebbed and flowed over the years, but Ruger continues to produce them (albeit in a “new” variety with a transfer bar safety bar that makes it safe to carry “locked and cocked”). The Single Nine and Single Ten are chambered in .22 Magnum and .22 Long Rifle respectively. This makes the Single Seven something of an oddity in its .327 Federal Magnum chambering.

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The Underappreciated Smith & Wesson 22A

The Smith & Wesson Model 41 has earned its place among the world’s finest .22 target pistols for good reason. And the SW22 Victory has been getting good press alongside Ruger’s Mark IV, which now joins the world of guns that can be taken down (and reassembled) by mere mortals. But what of Smith & Wesson’s forgotten 22A, which was made in their Houlton, Maine factory alongside handcuffs and other handgun parts?

The short answer: the 22A is a mixed bag, but given that new (or nearly new) examples can be found in the $200 range right now, they may be one of the best target .22LR bargains going.

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